Aug 20 2013

Under Construction: Tearing Down and Building Up

Tiffany CopperThe most popular Candler hangout spots these days are the 3rd through 5th floor lobbies looking down onto the construction site below. Every day without fail you can find a combination of faculty, students, and staff huddled around the window looking down into the site completely mesmerized by the process occurring in front them. There is something about watching a building being torn down and another one being erected that fascinates the human imagination. So much goes into the process of construction—destroying the old, clearing the site, pouring the foundation, anchoring the supports, building the new. It literally takes a village of workers to make the whole process occur. To theological minds, there is so much that you can do with this analogy.

Like my colleagues, all summer long I have been enthralled by the work of construction occurring around me. As the 2013 Candler Orientation Coordinator, I have found it interesting how similar the process of planning Orientation has been to the process of construction occurring below. With Orientation, you have to dissect the project into smaller manageable pieces, clear away those pieces that no longer belong and begin to build a new foundation for what is yet to come. It takes work—lots of work! And, the process could not occur without the help of countless people.

Reflecting back over the journey, on the eve of Orientation, I have come to realize that there are several lessons that I have gained from this experience. First, the process of constructing anything of substance, whether it be a building, an event or one’s own spiritual foundation, can be REAL MESSY. In the in-between stages of tearing down the old and erecting the new you have to be willing to get dirty. It is hard to do any real work without being willing to dig deep and entrench one’s hands in the dirt. The dirt, while it may not be pleasant to deal with, is a necessary part of the journey. The process can also feel REAL CHAOTIC with so much activity happening on the site all at one time. With the drilling, digging, hammering, and lifting it sometimes feels like there is more disorder than order occurring. But, the chaos only feels like disorder to those who are not aware of the builder’s plan. If you are willing to stick through the process to the end you will quickly discover that the chaos is actually organized and is heading somewhere. Construction also involves REAL TRANSFORMATION. It’s amazing how with a little help something old can be transformed into something brand new. It’s difficult to remain static when there is change occurring all around you.

The Orientation team chose the theme, “Under Construction: Tearing Down and Building Up,” for all of these reasons. It’s our hope that as incoming students embark upon this new journey that they will be willing to participate in the process of construction occurring within themselves. Theological education involves a lot of tearing down and building up. It can definitely feel real messy and chaotic sometimes. But, the beauty of the entire process is that if you stick with it to the end you can build something substantial.

–Tiffany Cooper

 Tiffany is the 2013 Candler Orientation Coordinator. She graduated from Candler with an MDiv degree in May 2013 after serving in the Office of Student Programming as a Student Life Coordinator. Originally from Cincinnati, Ohio, she attended Cincinnati Christian University before moving to Atlanta.


Jun 21 2011

A Candler Rhythm

It’s quiet in my office these days.  From mid-August through mid-May, the Office of Student Programming on the third floor of the School of Theology building is usually a bee hive of activity—with more than a dozen student staffers planning programs or tutoring ESOL students, Candler Coordinating Council (C3) executive officers at work on behalf of its sixteen student organizations, admissions staff or visitors from outside the school meeting in our conference room, faculty stopping by for  some late afternoon chocolate from the big glass candy jar on the front counter, students arriving for appointments with me, or just dropping by, to talk about what is going on in their lives—the OSP is a bustling place, with ideas and energy going in all directions to support Candler’s large and diverse student body.

But not right now.  Right now the June days in Atlanta are hot and languid, and the pace has slowed.  Summer school is in session, but classes are fewer and smaller; much of the time our corridors are cool and empty.  Many faculty are away doing research or writing, and administrative staff are writing reports and planning for next year.  ‘Tis the season for reflection about, and hopefully rest from, all that activity during the fall and spring semesters.

With just over a year behind me as Candler’s Director of Student Life and Spiritual Formation, I still am referring to this as my “Martha and Mary” job.  I like to think about what those two sisters from Luke’s gospel teach us about the values of hard work and activity, as well as about the values of reflection and rest.  We need both, yet it’s often a challenge to create a rhythm of life that incorporates first the one, and then the other, over and over again, so that we become whole people.  As much as I love the quieter days, and the opportunities they afford to step back from the “programming” to really think about “students,” I find myself getting restless.  I get up from my chair and go looking for people to talk to, or walk down to the Starbucks for an iced coffee I don’t need, or distract myself with a new project to keep me from, say, finishing this blog posting!

Figuring out how to create and sustain a balanced rhythm of life isn’t any easier as a student at Candler, but that’s one of the reasons the Office of Student Programming is here.  Yes, we offer plenty of activities that may keep you busy, and hopefully enhance your life as a seminarian—but we also offer ways for you to reflect and to rest.  If you’ve never been on a silent retreat for three days, or if you’ve never painted with water colors as a form of centering prayer, you will have that opportunity, and others like them, at Candler.  We’ll be looking for you on the third floor!

-The Rev. Ellen Echols Purdum

Rev. Purdum is Director of Student Life and Spiritual Formation at Candler.  An Episcopal priest in the Diocese of Atlanta, she can be found most Sundays preaching or presiding at Church of the Good Shepherd in the small town of Covington, Georgia.  Whether teaching high school students, or working with undergraduates and seminarians at The Fund for Theological Education, or now at Candler, she understands her vocation as listening to the lives of students.  She is a graduate of Emory University and the Candler School of Theology.


Jan 21 2011

Not in Kansas Anymore

Students from all over the world converge at Candler. Each individual brings unique perspectives, passions, and gifts, and Candler offers students boundless opportunities to engage in conversations that generate a passion for further exploration of God’s multi-faceted creation.  When I joined the Candler community it became apparent right away that my theological education would be contextualized by a larger world view; an opportunity with which this small town Kansan was eager to engage.

After arriving at Candler I immediately answered the call to be a conversation partner.  Conversation partners are native English speakers who volunteer to meet with international students once a week.  I was paired with a Korean student who wanted to gain proficiency with his English.  Getting to know Wang has been a highlight of my seminary experience.  Learning about his family, his culture, and how he experiences God has been meaningful and humbling.  It has been meaningful in the sense that he has given me new perspectives into God as a father, a husband, and as a foreigner.  Humbling in the sense that he is very intelligent and has bravely chosen to study theology in English; a difficult enough undertaking in one’s own language.  It is a wonderful gift to me to help him learn to articulate his ideas about life and God in ways that I have never imagined.

One-on-one interactions are not the only way I have interacted with people different than me.  As a class representative on the Candler Coordinating Council, our student governing body, I get to meet with other student leaders on a regular basis to discuss the ways in which we utilize our student funding for programs.  The council also encourages collaboration between organizations and offers several opportunities a year to discuss, in open forum, issues of cultural competency that help our community grow together.

I have also been involved in cross cultural dialog through classes that are cross-listed with other schools at Emory.  Classes with Business, Law, Nursing, and Public Health students have given me the opportunity to hear about issues in the world from a different academic perspective and also to talk about the church in a way that many people often do not experience; one as an active agent for justice.  One of the most fun and intense of the interdisciplinary opportunities available to Candler students is the opportunity to compete in the Global Health Institutes Case competition.  Interdisciplinary teams are formed, given a global health issue and then over a few days analyze, produce, and present a viable solution to the issue.  Not only did I make many friends from other schools, but the lens through which I see issues now incorporates little pieces of their law, health, and entrepreneurial perspectives.

Candler has offered me an authentic world-view-expanding experience. Through individual relationships, participation in Candler student organizations and doing interdisciplinary work, it is clear that I am not in Kansas anymore.  I am looking forward to taking this experience back home so that I can offer a theological lens with a broader world view to the communities I serve.

-Patrick McLaughlin

Patrick is a second year MDiv student from Hutchinson, KS and a Student Ambassador. In addition to his time serving the community, he serves as a class representative to the Candler Coordinating Council, is a Candler Conversation Partner, and is a member of the Candler Singers.


Nov 14 2008

Blogging from the AAR

From Kimberly Knight:

Each year Candler School of Theology offers sponsorship opportunities to students participating in professional conferences and educational events that support the School’s mission of “educating faithful and creative leaders for the church’s ministries in the world.” One such conference that students at Candler attend is the American Academy of Religion’s (AAR) Annual Conference. The AAR’s 2008 Annual Conference was held in Chicago, Illinois on November 1-3, 2008.

The AAR’s mission statement begins:

In a world where religion plays so central a role in social, political, and economic events, as well as in the lives of communities and individuals, there is a critical need for ongoing reflection upon and understanding of religious traditions, issues, questions, and values.

The AAR promotes such reflection through excellence in scholarship and teaching in the field of religion. This year, 2nd Year MDiv Student Ann Lister (below) received a Leadership Development Grant from Candler’s Office of Student Programming in order to attend the AAR meeting in Chicago. Ann is our contributing blogger today.

My AAR Experience
by Ann Lister

The opportunity to attend the American Academy of Religion Conference was a blessing. The energy at the conference was surreal. There was excitement in every session that I attended. The conference was everything I expected and more. While the sessions that I attended were very interesting, I was especially inspired by the consultation of the Black Religious Scholars Group (BRSG), on Friday evening. This event was held at the historical Trinity United Church of Christ and what a joy it was to be surrounded by African American scholars whose books I had read, especially Dr. Renita Weems. She was being honored as the 2008 BRSG Distinguished Religious Scholar and the whole evening was powerful. Dr. Weems shared her story of pain and struggle with the audience while rejoicing about the goodness of God.

Additionally, Dr. Weems reminded us of how the ancestors were rejoicing at the possibility of the first African American President; it was electrifying. I am grateful for my alma mater, Spelman College and the Leadership Development fund at Candler, for affording me this great opportunity. As a result of AAR, I returned to Atlanta with a fresh new outlook on my life as a seminarian. In the words of song-writer, Edwin Hawkins, “I feel like going on; though trials come on every hand, I feel like going on.”


Mar 7 2008

Methodist Madness

While many Candler School of Theology students go “church shopping” when school starts each fall to find a church home and worshipping congregation in the Atlanta area, many of our United Methodist students have the opportunity to go “conference shopping” in the spring. With such a diverse student body from across the globe, it makes sense that church bodies would want to “recruit” candidates for ministry here at Candler, and in turn, it is only natural that students would also like to size up the options for ministry from across the Church.

The Candler Office of Student Programming coordinates visits for tons of United Methodist Annual Conferences each year, but this time of year in particular, early spring, is our heavy meet-and-greet season. From Mississippi to Kansas and from Oregon or Idaho to North Carolina, The United Methodist Church is well represented on the Candler campus this semester. Between the start of 2008 and commencement in May, over ten conferences will send representatives from their Board of Ordained Ministry or Cabinet (I’ve even sited a bishop or two!) to both visit with Candler students from their conference and to talk with current students who may be interested in doing ministry in their region.

There are certainly plenty of students at Candler that are committed to be ordained or provide lay leadership to a specific conference, diocese, district, congregation, or community, but others are still looking for that perfect fit. In fact, during my first year at Candler, one of my classmates, who shall remain nameless, signed up for every single United Methodist Conference visit, particularly when the conference was offering a free meal to its student and inquiring candidates. Without fail, he attended every drop-in, meet-and-greet, dinner party, information session, and Q&A time for conferences ranging from the Pacific Northwest to Florida. He networked, ate, and made friends with students and conference officials from conferences in every United Methodist jurisdiction. That, my friends, is the connectional church at work!

It turns out that March is also a high season for prospective students to visit seminaries and schools of theology as well. So between the Boards of Ordained Ministry and the prospective students, you never know who you will run into at chapel or in class. Earlier this week we hosted 20 finalists for the Woodruff Fellowship, Candler’s most prestigious and generous scholarship award. The following day after they left, we had several individual visitors come to campus to learn more about Candler School of Theology. What I naturally deduce from all these visitors to campus is that Candler is either the center of the universe or the coolest place ever to study theology. In my optimism, I like to believe both, but I invite you to make a visit here so you can be the judge. World revolves around us or coolest learning environment ever?

With weeks still left in March, it’s hard to know how many visitors we’ll host to campus in the coming days, but I hope you are one of them. We have two admitted student visit days coming up later this semester, but we welcome prospective student visitors just about every Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday. Candler is an amazing community of students, faculty, staff and the occasional Bishop, and we would love for you to make us a permanent home for study and reflection in one of our degree programs. If you would like more information about Candler, please visit our website, email us at candleradmissions@emory.edu, or call us at 404.727.6326. Look for my profile on Facebook (Candler Intern-Theology), and you are welcome to join the Candler School of Theology Facebook group.


Dec 21 2007

Halfway to Graduation

What moments can you remember from your life’s journey in which you were halfway finished completing something? Some moments will certainly be more significant than others. You may remember being halfway through a candy bar; halfway through a good book; halfway to your destination; halfway through your Candler School of Theology admissions application or perhaps a research paper. There is an entire class of second year students, which we call Middlers, here at Candler who can celebrate the fact that they are halfway through their seminary career as Master of Divinity students. Three semesters down—three semester yet to go. This week, we have invited two of those Middlers to blog about their experiences here at Candler as they reflect upon being at the center of their seminary careers. Please continue reading below for the words of Lauren Lobenhofer and Jonathan Tompkins, two of our halfway to graduation students.

Brooks Commons at the Center
By Lauren Lobenhofer

Brooks Commons is the center of our everyday liturgy at Candler School of Theology. As I’ve learned in the first half of my time at Candler, worship consists of four parts: gathering, Word, meal, and sending forth. In reflecting on my time at Candler, I realized that liturgy is lived out every day in Brooks Commons, in the rhythms of our daily lives.

In the early morning, small clusters of sleepy students gather around the room, imbibing mass amounts of coffee. It is a time of fellowship, of rehashing the previous evening’s reading assignments, and of saying a quick “hello” between early morning prayer and the start of class. I see my friends, grab a snack from the vending machine, and head to class.

As I make my way to my classes, other students trickle into Brooks, lounging on the couches to read or setting up laptops on the tables around the room. The laughter and conversations from the early morning fade into quiet studying, and the only sounds that break the dense quiet are the noises and giggles of the youngest member of the Candler community, the seven-month-old child of two Candler students, who greets the entering students with her bright smiles.

But as the middle of the day approaches, the decibel level rises again as students gather around the tables to eat lunch. When chapel ends at noon, we crowd in to share the table together. Students heat packed lunches in the microwaves, purchase food from community lunch provided through the Office of Student Programming (OSP), and bring in food from the food court in Cox Hall. We overflow the room, crowding around the tables and forming clusters on the floor to share our meals, converse, and laugh together. It’s my favorite time of day at Candler. I love to eat with my friends as we laugh about ridiculous theological jokes and share our desserts.

As the clock ticks towards 1:00 p.m., most of us pour out the double doors of Brooks on our way to afternoon classes. Some remain behind, however, to meet with study groups and even professors during their open office hours. Students remain around the tables together to exegete texts and discuss theological ideas together.

Toward dinnertime, though, the students begin to depart. I usually stop into Brooks Commons before I leave for the day, just to see if anyone is still around, but I usually find it empty. The first few times that I saw Brooks Commons without students, it seemed sad to me. But when I started thinking about it, I realized that the absence of the community here means that they’re out doing ministry elsewhere. They have left behind this place of everyday worship and gone out to work in the world. So Brooks Commons sits empty, waiting for us to gather again the next day.

Lauren Lobenhofer is a originally from Ada, Ohio, a town with only four stoplights. She graduated from the University of Missouri with a degree in Interdisciplinary Studies, combining Religious Studies, Sociology, and History. She is a certified candidate in the United Methodist ministry process and hopes to become an Elder and serve in a parish setting, since she has been unable to achieve her childhood dream of becoming the quarterback of the Denver Broncos.

“Whoa, We’re Halfway There!”
by Jonathan Tompkins

I ran the Mardi Gras marathon in New Orleans a few years ago. During our training, I joked with my running mates that when we reached mile thirteen on the big day of the race, I was going to sing out “Whoa, we’re halfway there!” ala Bon Jovi’s song “Livin’ on a Prayer.” I am currently a year and a half into my “Candler marathon” and can sing this out as well.

This theological race I’m running resembles the Mardi Gras run in many ways (minus the beads and what some folks do to get them). Each involves much more than “livin’ on a prayer.” They require a deep sense of motivation, the proper training, the presence of running buddies, perseverance through pain, and a finish line. I came to Candler School of Theology after finally, with much weeping and gnashing of teeth, consenting to God’s call into ordained ministry. Since making that decision, I have continually been motivated by my Candler experience.

The theological and practical aspects of my education here have reaffirmed my call and have trained me in the ways of the servant-leader. I have met some wonderful and interesting people who have affirmed me, challenged me, and have kept me laughing as we run the race together. I have continued worshipping the God who loves me, sometimes in new and different ways, even when some aspects of my education have painfully shaken my faith. I keep my eyes on the finish line of graduation and entrance into the ministry while still thinking about the race so far and embracing the course ahead.

“Whoa, we’re halfway there…”, but we’re living on much, much more than a prayer. Thanks be to God for that.

Jonathan Tompkins is a second-year Master of Divinity student at Candler School of Theology. He grew up in upstate New York but relocated to Columbia, South Carolina after graduating from college. He taught middle school English for three years followed by five years as Director of Youth and College Ministries at a large United Methodist church. He has been married to his lovely wife Rebecca since August 12, 2006—two weeks before he started at Candler School of Theology. He is not singing “Whoa, we’re halfway there” when it comes to that.

Maybe halfway through reading this blog, you realized that you’d like to visit Candler to check out the atmosphere that Lauren describes about Brooks Commons, or perhaps Jonathan has encouraged you to run towards your calling. We would love to talk to you more abo
ut your call and where you feel your life and God may be leading you. If you are currently discerning if seminary is the next step in your faith journey, I hope you will consider Candler as a community for you to live into your calling. You should also consider visiting campus for the day so you can meet with an Admissions Advisor, attend class, participate in worship in Cannon Chapel, and eat lunch with current students. Please contact us in the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid at candleradmissions@emory.edu, call us at 404.727.6326, check us out online at www.candler.emory.edu/admissions/. In addition, look for my profile on Facebook, named Candler Intern-Theology, and the Candler School of Theology Group at www.facebook.com.


Dec 7 2007

Eventful Advent

It may have been the last week of classes here at Candler School of Theology, Emory University, before Reading Week and final exams, but there were an amazing amount of activities, worship services, and community gatherings that happened in these last few days of the semester. On Tuesday, there was a Brown Bag Lunch Conversation sponsored by the Oral History Project of Women in Theology and Ministry with Melva Costen, who is a widely recognized authority on music and worship. She is the author of African American Christian Worship and In Spirit and in Truth: The Music of African American Worship. Dr. Costen recently retired from the Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC), where she was the Helmar Emil Nielsen Professor of Music and Worship. The interview and conversation with Dr. Costen was part of our ongoing work in gathering stories of strong women who have helped shape their religious communities and the larger culture.

Then, on Wednesday, the Candler class “Christian Encounter with Hinduism,” taught by Dr. Thomas Thangaraj, the D.W. and Ruth Brooks Associate Professor of World Christianity, sponsored a free exhibition on Hinduism for all Candler students. There were displays, music, Indian finger foods, craft activities, and trivia to help learn more about Hinduism, along with an exhibition about Hindu Gods and Goddesses.

On Thursday, the Office of Student Programming turned Brooks Commons, the social gathering area for the seminary, into the “Candler Stress-Free Zone” for an intentional afternoon and evening of fun and relaxation for those feeling overwhelmed by finals. Loaded nachos, the movie Shrek 3, crafts, video games, and board games were the perfect combination of junk food and distractions to help people temporarily forget about the stress of final exams and papers that are yet to be completed.

These were indeed all wonderful events, but my favorite part of the week had to be the Hanging of the Greens service in chapel on Tuesday. It was a Service of Readings, Advent Carols, and Prayers for the Waiting World. During the singing, which included congregational hymns as well as special music from the Candler Singers, the Chapel Choir, and Voices of Imani, the chapel was prepared and decorated with greenery, poinsettias, Advent paraments, and the colors of the season.

The service was beautifully planned and presented—everything from the readings to the liturgical dances. In fact, each scripture reading was done in two languages by two people, who were standing across the altar table from each other. Various members of the Candler community, who come from places near and far, read the text in their native tongue. It was so moving to hear the Advent scriptures read in Shona, Russian, Korean, Tamil, and English. It reminds us that these sacred texts are universal and calls to each of us personally from the four corners of God’s creation. Those in attendance at this service certainly caught a glimpse of the in-breaking of the Kingdom of God as we worshipped, sat in silence, prayed, and lit the first candle on the Advent wreath together.

Because the semester is quickly coming to an end, the Candler community must squeeze Advent in four days instead of four weeks. Therefore, on Wednesday, the Office of Worship planned a Las Posadas service, which is an enactment of the Holy Family’s search for shelter, with songs in Spanish reflecting the Mexican origins of this service. Prayers were offered for those still searching for shelter, for food, for justice. The Thursday of Advent Week at Candler is always a Service of Artist Gifts, in which members of the Candler community offer their artistic expressions from music, dance, art, and spoken word. This service was themed around the Magnificat: My Soul Magnifies the Lord. Finally, the end of the week, as we light the last candle around the Advent wreath, we share in the Eucharist and feast at the Table. As students receive the Benediction on Friday, they have a week off for preparing and waiting for finals. And isn’t that what we are called to do during Advent? We wait and prepare for the coming Christ child with hopeful expectation.

As classes and final examinations end, the Candler student body will go home for the winter break, but we will continue to post blogs weekly. In fact, starting next Friday, we will begin a series of blogs which will be written by current students and others within the community. Though classes may not be in session, we are still around in the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid to answer your questions and talk to you about your discernment process and interest in Candler School of Theology. Feel free to contact us through the Advent, Christmas, and Epiphany seasons. You can email us at candleradmissions@emory.edu or call is at 404.727.6326. Also, check out my profile on Facebook (Candler Intern-Theology) and please join the Candler School of Theology Group at www.facebook.com.

Lane Cotton Winn 07T
Candler School of Theology
Office of Admissions and Financial Aid Intern


Nov 23 2007

Thanksgiving at Candler

While I was a “Recruiter on the Road” last week, one of the pinnacle events of the fall semester at Candler School of Theology, Emory University was happening during my absence. Certainly, I was not expecting the Candler community to plan events around my schedule, but I was saddened to miss the annual Thanksgiving Dinner, nonetheless. It is all that I have been hearing about from friends around campus, and everyone turned out this year for this special evening of dining and fellowship. For well over ten years, the Office of Student Programming (OSP) at Candler has sponsored and hosted a traditional Thanksgiving dinner to students, faculty, staff, and families of Candler as a gift to the community.

Cynthia Meyer, Assistant Dean of Students, along with her staff of students, yearly transform Brooks Commons, the gathering grounds of the Candler student body for study, meals, and hanging out, into a warm, homey atmosphere that would make Martha Stewart proud. This year’s menu included favorite dishes such as turkey, gravy, stuffing/dressing, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, green beans, carrot soufflé, macaroni and cheese, and dinner rolls. What more could a starving student want with just weeks left in the semester until final examinations? Well, if you had any room left after going back for seconds and thirds, there is always dessert. This year’s Thanksgiving dinner ended in sweetness with sliced treats like pumpkin pie, pecan pie, and red velvet cake, which I hear was the hit of the dessert table.

There is such a great turnout and excitement behind this event that they had to offer three seating throughout the late afternoon and evening to accommodate the number of guests at dinner. In reflecting on the event, Cynthia Meyer said, “The annual Thanksgiving Dinner has developed into a great tradition of feasting and sharing. Gathering together like a huge extended family reminds us of the importance of community. The dinner also prompts us to give thanks here at Candler for the gifts of one another and our shared experiences of learning, worshipping and growing together.”

Upon entering the newly decorated space and scanning Brooks Commons in search of friends to sit near, you see clusters of faculty and staff sitting among students. This is a setting of much dialog and celebration. In fact, Dr. Steven J. Kraftchick, Director of General & Advanced Programs and Associate Professor of the Practice of New Testament Interpretation was spotted eating with all the first year Master of Theological Studies (MTS) students. Dr. Kraftchick is the MTS Advisor, and because the first year MTS students had a colloquy, which is a fancy Latin word for discussion group, with the professor immediately following the first dinner seating, the group decided to attend the meal together before class began. Continuing to pan the room, you can see the staff of the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid eating merrily together, as well as Dean Jan Love greeting students as she munches on her plate of food.

Thanksgiving Dinner at Candler is one of my favorite events of the school year because it invites our entire community to take a break around the table together over a shared meal. Kim Jackson, Master of Divinity (MDiv) Middler said of the dinner, “I had an absolutely wonderful time. The food was great, and it was a welcomed break from all the studying that I’ve been doing as we near the end of the semester.” As this academic season comes to a close, there is much haste and excitement heading into final examinations and the winter break from classes. In this brief exercise of pause and fellowship, we are invited to give thanks, serve one another, and feast at the banquet that has been prepared for us. Sounds a lot like communion, doesn’t it? And for me, it is a sacred moment.

Where have you experienced sacred moments in your everyday life?

What are you thankful for?

What is your favorite Thanksgiving dish or meal to eat?

We would love to host you next year at Candler’s Thanksgiving Dinner, and for you to become a part of this vibrant community. For more information about Candler School of Theology, visit our website at www.candler.emory.edu, or email the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid at candleradmissions@emory.edu. In addition, you can call us at 404.727.6326, or learn more about the admissions process at Candler by clicking here. Look for my profile on Facebook (Candler Intern-Theology) and the Candler School of Theology Group at www.facebook.com.