Mar 6 2009

There’s Something ‘Bout the Southland in the Winter/Springtime

I love Atlanta and I love the weather here. Maybe not so much when there’s a snowstorm while trying to coordinate travel for 20 some people flying into town from all over the world, like I did this past Sunday (see healthy snowman, left). But I do love this time of year. Yes, we got our bi-annual snowstorm (anytime there is snow in the air at all= a “storm”), but fear not, next week it’s supposed to be 82 degrees (see snowman carcass, right)!

Though it might seem trite, one of the great things about living in Atlanta is the weather. If you’ve never spent a spring in Atlanta or the South, you might not fully appreciate Emily Saliers’ “Southland in the Springtime,” on the Indigo Girls’ third solo album Nomads, Indians, and Saints. (Incidentally, Emily is daughter of Candler emeritus professor Don Saliers, an amazing musician in his own right. Together they published A Song to Sing, A Life to Live: Reflections on Music as Spiritual Practice in 2004)

This past weekend was cold, but the average high temperature in March in Atlanta is 65°F and the average low is 43°F. Not bad. The daffodils are almost all up, and some of them have already faded. The Bartlett pear trees are in full bloom and everyone should be out in the parks this weekend!

Weather.com had a little piece on March and April in Atlanta. They also have a chart of the monthly highs and lows. Read on and come check out Atlanta this spring. Being a Chicagoan by birth, I can say Yankees (i.e., someone from outside the south, be it Ohio, Oklahoma, or Oregon) are always welcome in Atlanta!

In March and April, Atlanta’s temperatures are pleasant, and the city is awash in the blooms of dogwoods, cherry trees, and azaleas. September and October often bring Indian summers, and the temperate weather can linger as late as mid-November. The short winter is usually fairly moderate.

The New York Post also published a story some time ago about a family from New York City relocating to Atlanta. Great story. You, too, could come down South and live the good life! And it might even snow!